Arab Spring

2011 - Northern Africa, Middle East

Arab revolutions of 2011. In Tunisia, Libya, Syria and Morocco. My work on Egypt, where I couldn't be when the revolution went off in january 2011, can be seen in the portraits & collages in 'Freedom Fighters - Arab Spring'.
Personal projects

Tunisian revolution

2011 - Tunisia
Information technologies were at the heart of the revolution.
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Amin and a friend are recording and posting almost instantly informations on their Facebook page. Tunis, January 2011.
The infamous Tunisian Ministry of Interior. Tunis, February 2011.
Amin manages a Facebook page on which he publishes all possible informations about the post Ben Ali’s fall days. Tunis, January 2011.
A Thank You Facebook graffiti. Tunis, January 2011.
On central Bourguiba avenue, marchs and protests come after one another, as the transition government is still made of supporters of former Ben Ali’s party RCD. Tunis, January 26, 2011.
Central Bourguiba avenue has turned into a giant political agora, swamped with impassioned debates. People discover the freedom of expression. Tunis, January 2011.
At the Youth and Sports Ministry. Slim Amamou, 33, corporate consulting and web solutions and programming, became the most famous cybernetic icon of the tunisian revolution, after being arrested and interrogated for 5 days at the Ministry of Interior for cyber-activism. He was released along with his friend Aziz Amami on january 13th 2011, then appointed Secretary of State for Youth and Sports on january 17. Tunis, February 8, 2011.
Fahem Boukadous, correspondant journalist for El Hiwar Ettounsi and for alternative websites, was released from jail on January 19th, 2011. He had been condemned to a 4 years sentence for taking part and filming social unrest and demonstrations in Gafsa mining region in 2008. A fellow journalist recognises him and greets him under great emotion in a restaurant of downtown Tunis. Tunis, February 8th, 2011.
A ‘Caravan of Freedom’ come from inside the country has reached Tunis and an occupation of the Casbah Square has been lasting for days. They claim for a true new government, rid of former Ben Ali’s supporters. Tension is in the air today, as they know the police forces will soon come and chase them away. Tunis, January 28th, 2011.
A ‘Caravan of Freedom’ come from inside the country has reached Tunis and an occupation of the Casbah Square has been lasting for days. They claim for a true new government, rid of former Ben Ali’s supporters. Tension is in the air today, as they know the police forces will soon come and chase them away. Tunis, January 28th, 2011.
A ‘Caravan of Freedom’ come from inside the country has reached Tunis and an occupation of the Casbah Square has been lasting for days. They claim for a true new government, rid of former Ben Ali’s supporters. Tension is in the air today, as they know the police forces will soon come and chase them away. Tunis, January 28th, 2011.
A ‘Caravan of Freedom’ come from inside the country has reached Tunis and an occupation of the Casbah Square has been lasting for days. They claim for a true new government, rid of former Ben Ali’s supporters. Tension is in the air today, as they know the police forces will soon come and chase them away. Tunis, January 28th, 2011.
Valentine’s Day, people on the central Bourguiba avenue show their love for their country. Tunis, February 14th, 2011.
Two youngsters take advantage of a nearby hotel wi-fi network. Tunis, January 2011.
Manoubia Bouazizi, the mother of Mohamed Bouazizi who set himself on fire in Sidi Bouzid on December 17th, 2010, an event considered to be the sparkle that triggered Tunisian revolution. Tunis, October 2011.
Anti Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak protest in front of the embassy in Tunis. Burst of joy when the crowd hears he would be resigning that day. Tunis, February 11th, 2011.
After the fall of Ben Ali, many candidates to emigration for European countries tried their luck from various coastal points. This young boy, 16, has experienced several failed attempts, for technical reasons. El Haouaria, February 2011.
Because of the revolution, the highly touristic zone of Djerba is desperately awaiting the tourists’ comeback. Local people working in this industry are ready but quite worried. Djerba, February 2011.
Because of the revolution, the highly touristic zone of Djerba is desperately awaiting the tourists’ comeback. Local people working in this industry are ready but quite worried. Djerba, February 2011.
Because of the revolution, the highly touristic zone of Djerba is desperately awaiting the tourists’ comeback. Local people working in this industry are ready but quite worried. Djerba, February 2011.
Souvenir of the siege of the Kasbah in Tunis, a teargas bullet. Meknassy, February, 2011.
Above view in Thala and the limestone factory, which was the main local employer before it was closed for mining license issue. Thala, a 40.000 odds town said to have the highest rate of unemployment nationwide, is at the heart of this central region where lied the roots and first sparkles of the revolution. Tunisia, October 2011.
The country is preparing for a nationwide polling day to take place on October 23d. The elected representatives will have to draw up a new constitution after Ben Ali’s regime fall in January 2011. Gafsa, October 13th, 2011.
In front of this administrative building Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in December 2010, the trigger of the January 2011 revolution. Sidi Bouzid, February 2011.
Tunis, January 2011.
After Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled away on january the 14th, 2011 the main downtown avenue Habib Bourguiba turned into a giant political agora for a couple of weeks. The avenue was swamped with impassioned debates and a crowd intoxicated with this democracy’s pillar : freedom of expression.
Tunisian Feminism (2011-2012)
A modest tribute to Didon - the founder and first Queen of Carthage for the Phoenician people on the present day Tunisian coastline, in 814 B.C. This series takes a quick look at Tunisian womanness, in this country which was a forerunner in the Arab world in terms of women rights, and has been profoundly secular and liberal in that way since the 1950's. Tunis Fashion Week launched its 2011 edition under the slogan Handsome and Free. As freedom of expression back since Ben Ali's fall it allows everyone to speak out now, so do the islamists and the salafists. They have brought a new fear among the Tunisian society that has just got rid of deeply rooted fear from Ben Ali's repressive regime ; the return of retrograde ideas, to which women would pay a heavy toll. Grounded fears or political manipulation? Future will tell, in the meantime Tunisian and free women just hope this is just a bad dream.
Photographs include some reproductions of Faiza magazine pages, the first women and feminist afro-arabic magazine (1959-1968).
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Afternoon gig at IHEC, High School for Commerce, Carthage neighborhood, a chic and trendy area. Students invited famous tunisian singers to have a partying saturday afternoon, and thus celebrate the end of Ben Ali’s regime which was not really possible till then. Tunis, february 19, 2011.
Afternoon gig at IHEC, High School for Commerce, Carthage neighborhood, a chic and trendy area. Students invited famous tunisian singers to have a partying saturday afternoon, and thus celebrate the end of Ben Ali’s regime which was not really possible till then. Tunis, february 19, 2011.
Afternoon gig at IHEC, High School for Commerce, Carthage neighborhood, a chic and trendy area. Students invited famous tunisian singers to have a partying saturday afternoon, and thus celebrate the end of Ben Ali’s regime which was not really possible till then. Tunis, february 19, 2011.
Afternoon gig at IHEC, High School for Commerce, Carthage neighborhood, a chic and trendy area. Students invited famous tunisian singers to have a partying saturday afternoon, and thus celebrate the end of Ben Ali’s regime which was not really possible till then. Tunis, february 19, 2011.
Afternoon gig at IHEC, High School for Commerce, Carthage neighborhood, a chic and trendy area. Students invited famous tunisian singers to have a partying saturday afternoon, and thus celebrate the end of Ben Ali’s regime which was not really possible till then. Tunis, february 19, 2011.
Double spread of Faiza, first women and feminist afro-arabic magazine (1959-1968). Title reads : Spring in Tunisia.
Habib Bourguiba avenue, downtown Tunis, a graffiti says : Tunisian woman is free and will stay free. Tunis, April 2011.
As every friday after the prayer for several weeks now, islamists hold the floor on central avenue Habib Bourguiba, downtown Tunis. They are out for mediatisation and to rant the passersby. Here the Hizb Ut Tahrir ( Ettahrir ) fundamentalists. Tunis, April 2011.
As every friday after the prayer for several weeks now, islamists hold the floor on central avenue Habib Bourguiba, downtown Tunis. They are out for mediatisation and to rant the passersby. Here the Hizb Ut Tahrir ( Ettahrir ) fundamentalists. Tunis, April 2011.
Hizb Ut Tahrir ( Ettharir ) fundamentalists demonstrate. This radical islamist movement makes its first public appearance since Ben Ali’s fall. This movement is spread worldwide and has millions of members. Tunis, February 11th, 2011.
Double spread of Faiza, first women and feminist afro-arabic magazine (1959-1968). Title reads : Long live the Republic.
A girl and a boy on well-off neighbourhood of La Marsa seaside. Tunis, April 2011.
Three friends on well-off neighbourhood of La Marsa seaside. Tunis, April 2011.
Students in wealthy Carthago neighbourhood. Tunis, April 2011.
Faten and Malouka , two best friends on the seaside in well-off neighbourhood of La Marsa. Faten (left) would love to make a model’s career. Tunis, April 2011.
Faten would love to make a model’s career. Tunis, April 2011.
Tunis Fashion Week 2011. Tunis, April 2011.
Tunis Fashion Week 2011. Soumaya, 22, student in fashion design and model-making at ESMOD Tunis. One can meet many veiled girls in Tunis feeling outraged by the fundamentalists position. Tunis, April 2011.
Tunis Fashion Week 2011. Students show. Two models and a fashion designer studying at IS3M, High Institute for Fashion of Monastir. Tunis, April 2011.
Young Tunisian fashion designer Seyf Dean Laouiti after presenting his first collection, well acclaimed. Fashion model Nour Guiga came for the show as a good friend of him. Carthage, Tunis, april 2012.
Tunis Fashion Week 2011. Tunisian flag inspired this highly acclaimed dress in post-revolution times. By Haythem Bouhamed, Angelos Couture. Tunis, April 2011.
Double spread of Faiza, first women and feminist afro-arabic magazine (1959-1968). Title reads : Do you know your rights ?
A graffiti says : Extremism is injurious to health, in La Marsa neighbourhood. Tunis, April 2011.
Friends on Habib Bourguiba avenue, downtown Tunis, April 2011.
Friends on Habib Bourguiba avenue, downtown Tunis, April 2011.
Double spread of Faiza, first women and feminist afro-arabic magazine (1959-1968). Title reads : The young Tunisian girl and love.
Tunis Fashion Week 2012. A model.
Tunis Fashion Week 2012.
Tunis Fashion Week 2012. Khaoula, studying fashion design at ISDM high school.
Tunis Fashion Week 2012. Provocative collection by promising Tunisian fashion designer Ahmed Talfit.
Tunis Fashion Week 2012. Faten Ben Mabrouk, model and organizing member of the event.
Double spread of Faiza, first women and feminist afro-arabic magazine (1959-1968).
Wild nights at The Plug, the place to be at the moment in the Tunisian capital. Alternative and hype, crazy nights go one after another in this club where one can meet a nice mix of people, who sometimes give the impression they have to party to the limits before Islamists in power would decide to act against free partying and alcohol. Just in case… La Marsa, Tunis, april 2012.
Wild nights at The Plug, the place to be at the moment in the Tunisian capital. Alternative and hype, crazy nights go one after another in this club where one can meet a nice mix of people, who sometimes give the impression they have to party to the limits before Islamists in power would decide to act against free partying and alcohol. Just in case… La Marsa, Tunis, april 2012.
Wild nights at The Plug, the place to be at the moment in the Tunisian capital. Alternative and hype, crazy nights go one after another in this club where one can meet a nice mix of people, who sometimes give the impression they have to party to the limits before Islamists in power would decide to act against free partying and alcohol. Just in case… La Marsa, Tunis, april 2012.
Wild nights at The Plug, the place to be at the moment in the Tunisian capital. Alternative and hype, crazy nights go one after another in this club where one can meet a nice mix of people, who sometimes give the impression they have to party to the limits before Islamists in power would decide to act against free partying and alcohol. Just in case… La Marsa, Tunis, april 2012.
Double spread of Faiza, first women and feminist afro-arabic magazine (1959-1968). Title reads : Will women be the basis of Grand Maghreb Unity ?
Wild nights at The Plug, the place to be at the moment in the Tunisian capital. Alternative and hype, crazy nights go one after another in this club where one can meet a nice mix of people, who sometimes give the impression they have to party to the limits before Islamists in power would decide to act against free partying and alcohol. Just in case… La Marsa, Tunis, april 2012.
Wild nights at The Plug, the place to be at the moment in the Tunisian capital. Alternative and hype, crazy nights go one after another in this club where one can meet a nice mix of people, who sometimes give the impression they have to party to the limits before Islamists in power would decide to act against free partying and alcohol. Just in case… La Marsa, Tunis, april 2012.
Double spread of Faiza, first women and feminist afro-arabic magazine (1959-1968). Title reads : As Bourguiba said. (Habib Bourguiba was the first post-independance president and brought the Woman Code which liberated them).
Dorra Bouzid, first female journalist in Tunisia and founder of first women magazine Faiza in the 50’s. Tunis, April 2012.

Libyan revolution

2011 - Libya
This revolution took a much more classic turn, as an armed conflict and civil war ensued.
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Past the Egypt and Lybia border, Eastern Lybia on the road to Benhazi, revolutionary committees take care of security controls. Lybia, february 27, 2011.
Past the Egypt and Lybia border, Eastern Lybia on the road to Benhazi, revolutionary committees take care of security controls. Lybia, february 27, 2011.
Eastern Lybia, entering the town of Tobruk is controlled by revolutionary committees. Some of them say they got their weapons from African mercenaries they caught and killed. Lybia, february 27, 2011.
Friday’s prayer at the Mahkama square, the opposition center and headquarters. Benghazi, Libya, March 2011.
Friday’s prayer at the Mahkama square, the opposition center and headquarters. Benghazi, Libya, March 2011.
Key oil port town of Brega, south of Benghazi city, has been attacked by Gaddafi’s militia since early this morning. Three friends decide to rush out to Brega and have fun. Benghazi, march the 2d, 2011.
Outside the key oil port town of Brega that has been attacked by Gaddafi’s militia since early this morning. Opposition forces have finally driven Gaddafi troops out of town. March the 2d, 2011.
Outside the key oil port town of Brega that has been attacked by Gaddafi’s militia since early this morning. Opposition forces had finally driven Gaddafi troops out of town, but late in the afternoon a plane dropped two bombs near the university. Brega, march the 2d, 2011.
A mother at a hospital in Ajdabiya, located between Benghazi and Brega, where injured fighters of the opposition are rushed in. Key oil port town of Brega, south of Ajdabiya, has been attacked by Gaddafi’s militia since early this morning. March the 2d, 2011.
Many neighbourhoods of Benghazi city are extremely poor and have been totally neglected by Gaddafi’s regime for far too long. Libya, Benghazi, March 2011.
A correspondant of Al Jazeera is trying to connect with his base to send material.
A Russian TV journalist at work. The rooftop is used as the connecting hub via a satellite device.
A volunteer decided to erase Gaddafi’s image on a wall inside the press center.
A slogan creator and painter.
The Katibha was Gaddafi’s forces garrison house in Benghazi. A bunker where weaponry was found and plundered. This is were heavy and forceful fights took place during three days that led to the insurgency’s victory on february 17th. It has now become sort of a touristic attraction. Benghazi, Libya, March 2011.
Outside the key oil port town of Brega that has been taken again by Gaddafi’s militia, freedom fighters are going to the frontline. March 2011.
Outside the key oil port town of Brega that has been taken again by Gaddafi’s militia, freedom fighters go through a Gaddafi troops aircraft bombing. March 2011.
Two freedom fighters killed on the frontline are taken to the Mahkama square for a funeral prayer. Libya, Benghazi, March 2011.
Two freedom fighters killed on the frontline are taken to the Mahkama square for a funeral prayer. Libya, Benghazi, March 2011.
Important gathering and intense joy at the Mahakma square in front of the headquarters of the Libyan National Transition Council, which has been officially recognised by the French government today. For the first time one could see french flags among those of the uprising arab countries. Benghazi, Libya, March 10th, 2011.
First week in Eastern and free Libya. Entered via the Egyptian border. February 28 to March 05th.
Green Like Hell
Virtually every shop roller shutter in town is painted in green. Official buildings, if they have any colour, will display green. This is the official colour of Gaddafi's regime and his famous ideological Green Book. If one would dare paint it in another colour, he would for sure get into trouble. The situation in the country brought most of the shops to stay closed, consequently this colour stands out even more than usual. Benghazi, Libya, March 2011.

Syrian revolution

Revolution in Syria – 6 months later…
Content of these amateur videos compilation is graphic, shocking and may hurt some. However the most shocking fact is the complete impunity this barbaric and feudal regime has been granted for 6 months.

Morocco’s postponed revolution

2011 - Morocco
Anticipated legislative elections of november 25th, 2011 were set to put down the growing unrest of Moroccan population. The big favorite, Abdelilah Benkirane, leader of the islamist Justice and Development Party and validated by the King, won.
On assignment for Le Monde French daily newspaper.
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Protest of the Movement of the 20th of February, calling to boycott the upcoming elections and claiming for a real parliamentary monarchy. November 20th, 2011, Casablanca, Morocco.
Political parties billposting wall in Sidi Moumen popular neighbourhood. November 25th, 2011, Casablanca, Morocco.
Zaouia neighbourhood in Safi, an industrial town of about 600.000, known for its long lasting leftist-unionist spirit. Unemployment is high since dwindling of its industry – mainly phosphate and sardine – and investments in the region has become scarce, thus its competitiveness. November 24th, 2011, Morocco.
Istiqlal political party leaflets handing out in Zaouia neighbourhood in Safi, an industrial town of about 600.000, known for its long lasting leftist-unionist spirit. Those people are generally not militants but volunteers getting paid for the job. November 24th, 2011, Morocco.
Zaouia neighbourhood in Safi, an industrial town of about 600.000, known for its long lasting leftist-unionist spirit. Unemployment is high since dwindling of its industry – mainly phosphate and sardine – and investments in the region has become scarce, thus its competitiveness. November 24th, 2011, Morocco.
Zaouia neighbourhood, thirty or so members and activists of the Movement of the 20th of February are calling to boycott the upcoming elections. November 24th, 2011, Safi, Morocco.
Polling day, political parties poll observers in Anfa posh neighbourhood. November 25th, 2011, Casablanca, Morocco.
Ministry of Interior, the minister Tayeb Cherkaoui announces a participation rate of 45% but tells that election results will be given the day after. November 25th, 2011, Rabat, Morocco.
At the Ministry of Interior, little before partial results are announced, in which Islamist Justice and Development Party is already known as the hands-down winner. November 26th, 2011, Rabat, Morocco.
At the Ministry of Interior, the minister Taieb Cherkaoui in a consultation with USFB general secretary after partial results were announced, in which Islamist Justice and Development Party is already known as the hands-down winner. November 26th, 2011, Rabat, Morocco.
End of the polling day, Abdelilah Benkirane (right), leader of the Islamist Justice and Development Party, known as the big favorite, at the campaign headquarters. November 25th, 2011, Rabat, Morocco.
At the local branch of the victorious Islamist Justice and Development Party in the city of Kenitra, in a popular neighbourhood, militants have started celebrating before the official final results, supposed to be announced the day after. November 26th, 2011, Kenitra, Morocco.
At the local branch of the victorious Islamist Justice and Development Party in the city of Kenitra, in a popular neighbourhood, militants have started celebrating before the official final results, supposed to be announced the day after. November 26th, 2011, Kenitra, Morocco.
At the local branch of the victorious Islamist Justice and Development Party in the city of Kenitra, in a popular neighbourhood, militants have started celebrating before the official final results, supposed to be announced the day after. November 26th, 2011, Kenitra, Morocco.
At the local branch of the victorious Islamist Justice and Development Party in the city of Kenitra, in a popular neighbourhood, militants have started celebrating before the official final results, supposed to be announced the day after. November 26th, 2011, Kenitra, Morocco.
Press conference of Abdelilah Benkirane, leader of the victorious Islamist Justice and Development Party at their campagne headquarters after the final results were announced. November 27th, 2011, Rabat, Morocco.
Press conference of Abdelilah Benkirane, leader of the victorious Islamist Justice and Development Party at their campagne headquarters after the final results were announced. November 27th, 2011, Rabat, Morocco.
Abdelilah Benkirane, leader of the victorious Islamist Justice and Development Party at their campagne headquarters after the final results were announced and his press conference. November 27th, 2011, Rabat, Morocco.
Militants of the Islamist Justice and Development Party celebrate their victory in the streets of the capital Rabat. November 27th, 2011, Rabat, Morocco.

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